About your Search

20131029
20131029
STATION
ALJAZAM 14
CNNW 11
MSNBC 11
MSNBCW 11
CSPAN2 5
COM 3
FBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
WJZ (CBS) 2
CSPAN 1
KICU 1
KOFY 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 81
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamentary delegation is preparing for a visit to the u.s. to express concerns over nsa surveillance tactics. political commentator sam sacks brings us more. >> german intelligence officials will come to washington dc to demand answers from the white house about surveillance on chancellor angela merkel. is a marked the partner from just a few months ago, when germany was defending its foes cooperation with the nsa. that was after edward snowden leak in june that the nsa was collecting a half ilya and telephone and internet telik communications every month. chancellor angela merkel was put to defend her government's cooperation with the nsa, saying it prevented terrorist attacks. we can only protect the population if we cooperate with others, her office said. edward snowden describe the cozy relationship between german spies and t
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate ? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that sve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intell
, he says, i didn't know about it, no one told me about deputy director of the cia saying snowden is a trader. see if you change your opinion about what he did. was he a whistleblower, was he a trader? listen. >> i do not believe he is a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he betrayed his country. >> how serious a hit to national security? >> i think this is the most serious leak. the most serious compromise of classified information. >> because of the amount of it or the type? >> the amount and the type. >> you have to understand, because snowden is the guy that put us in this position is what the intelligence officials are saying. that he is the source of this information that is manying forward that has become, now, an embarrassment to the united states. so i ask you out there and i ask the people at this table, do you still share the same opinion of snowden that you did in the beginning? >> i do. this is my guy you said? this is what you said? democrat? >> he's a career civil servant who was president obama's choice for the cia. >> to call this the greatest b
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
-hugger jeans in a bunch over the latest revelation from moscow craigslist futon buyer edward snowden. jim? >> german chancellor angela merkel complained directly to president obama today over reports of u.s. spying on her conversations. >> german officials saying they have received information that the chancellor's cell phone may be monitored by american intelligence. >> an angry merkel says the allegations have left u.s. and europeans relations "severely shaken." >> stephen: oh, big deal. (laughter) merkel should be flattered. someone looked at the chancellor of germany and said "i'd tap that." (cheers and applause) besides, we aren't even doing it, right, white house spokesman jay carney? >> i can tell you that the president assures the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> stephen: kay? (laughter) we are not and will not that takes care of the present and the future and there's no other time periodic think of. >> the u.s. has been listening to merkel's cell phone since 2002. >> stephen: oh, the past? who cares!
have with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated the conditions under which he got those. he is a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. some people want to say he is a whistle-blower, he is no whistle-blower, he has done enormous damage to the united states by talking about my methods we collect -- about methods we collect intelligence. >> what do you think about edward snowden? is he a genuine whistle-blower, a traitor, a bit of both? >> in effect, i think that -- well, a legitimate whistle-blower is one who is the curator of the information that they're distributing. i didn't feel that that was the case with manning. and i don't think that that is the case with snowden. i did feel that was the case with daniel ellsburgh. i think that we will find forgiveness in our justice system and in our hearts when somebody has called foul on crimes -- by our government against our people. or against other governments or people. but what has become a kind -- the whistle-blower term is being associated with a blitz of information, base
was terminated after the white house learned of it. meanwhile in the latest example of edward snowden screwing over america the spanish newspaper reported that the nsa monitored the 60 million phone calls made in spain -- i didn't know they had that many phones -- last december. they refused to grant snowden asylum. >> see if that is not bullying, i don't know what bullying is, and i think there should be an organization to punish those dogs. did the president know about the spying on merkel or did he not know or did he not not know. >> remember, merkel rhymes with erkle. >> merkel. i don't know if he knew, but there is nobody more frustrated and more outraged than president obama. we should just trust he can get to the bottom. >> i think he is upset. he gets things done. if he didn't know we were listening in on the phone calls of our friendly government leader should he have? shouldn't he let the nsa do what they want to do? >> no, we know two things. he was the last to know and no one is more upset. but it is weird how he knows nothing. he is the last to know other than killing bin laden be
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
spied on by there were reports of him coming from edward snowden. and then a separate report in the el mound doe newspaper indicated that some 60 million people in spain, as well as 35 world leaders. their phones being tapped. giving some rather interesting numbers that have not been disclosed before. he said that their mission began on september 11th which is a reframe that has been heard time and time again, as this debate raged on, he said that on that day, 2,996 people were killed on september 11th, but here is the part that is that public has never heard before, he said that 20 beam from the nsa have been killed fighting what is called the war on terrorism, since then, and that 6,000 people from the nsa were deployed i guess to gather intelligence. he says there has not been a mass casualty in this country since 2001, he says that is not by luck, they have not stopped trying. he also points out that they have stopped 13 incidents in the united states, another 25 incidents across europe. anyclapper also saying he believes that we have been lawful, with regards to what has been taki
, thanks to his source, former nsa contractor edward snowden, who is now hold up in russia, but the hits keep coming from him. the diplomatic impact kicked up an order of magnitude, though, over reports from the german paper that german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone, her cell phone, had also been bugged by the nsa after a direct, and i'm guessing kind of brusk call between the chancellor and president obama, the white house released a statement saying that the president "assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of chancellor merkel." is not and will not in the future. those are the key phrases here. so, we're not doing it now and we won't going forward, but did we in the past? >> has the united states monitored the chancellor's phone calls in the past? >> nedra, we are not going to publicly comment on every piece of policy and we have made clear that the united states gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations. >> so, no comment on the past. we don't still do it, we won't do it again, but why
they are able to do is not necessarily what they should be doing. follows fresh weeks from edward snowden, which indicate the agency eased drops on over 30 world leaders. mr. obama has not commented on any specific allegations. something one of his key senate allies has already proposed. >> with respect to the collection of intelligence, some leaders of u.s. allies, including france, aim, mexico and germany but let me state unequivocally i am totally opposed. >> another group in washington who are also dissatisfied, a delegation of the eeu leaders. they say trust needs to be rebuilt and will be looking for more answers when they meet over the next two days. >> thank you for watching "f rance 24." ♪ >> the paris masters first round. starting brightly. the first set next to an unanswered break. the pair met in the 2012 australian open. the frenchman could not pressure his opponents, missing the three chances at a second set. converting two of his own to win comfortably 6-4. next up, another frenchman. what a day it approved for a little-known frenchman and a first round. ranks 189 in the world.
intelligence officer, edward snowden. then, the embarrassin embarrassa merkel phone tapping. barack obama is ordering a,. >> trying to get some answers. they've said that trust needs to be rebuilt. but in a few hours' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizen
distinction between fighting terrorism together but not spying on friends. >> reporter: edward snowden leaked documents revealing the u.s. tapped german chancellor's cell phone and eavesdropped on more than 60 million private conversations in spain in just one month. >> we have the feeling that your closest allies are spying on you, that's difficult to such an ally in an open way anymore. >> we care about our privacy and mass surveillance is something we are very disturbed by. >> reporter: february steered clear of the controversy as he helped swear in his new fbi director but the white house says u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. former state department analyst says the u.s. won't stop the program because in the post 9/11 world, the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means more successful attacks. >> reporter: the white house hopes to complete its surveillance review by the end of the year. and leaks from snowden reveal the nsa listened to the conversations of 35 foreign leaders in all. reporting live, meghan mccorkell, wjz eyewitness news. >> m
-top-secret surveillance programs have been under fire for months now, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder wa when it was revealed e u.s. was eaves dropping not only on enemies but allys. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent b.a.r.t. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied to friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapolog
, that includes many that showed over the weekend protesting the nsa and some supporting edward snowden here. this has broadened out and one of the big questions remains today, what information was provided to the president, particularly adds it relates to spying on our allies in the collection of data in that form. >> we don't know what kind of information the administration has. we heard them say they didn't have that information. dianne feinstein wasn't aware of the program. that is an interesting question. either way, it presents problems for the administration if they did know about it, why was that continued to allowed to go forward. if it didn't know about it, why is it oversight of these programs. >> let me play what adam schiff said. >> absolutely believe that the program in its current form for end and be restructured because we can get all of the same information to protect the country that we need to without getting this wealth of data. and all programs should be constitutional, effective and should be structured in a way to minimize any unnecessary intrusion on our privacy. >> w
they took place. they cited classified documents by edward snowden and the spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. u.s. leaders have been scrambling to reassure their allies after a swrooishs of allegations about spying. a french newspaper said u.s. acts intercepted more than 17 million phone calls and e-mails in france in a one-month period. german newspaper said monitor chancellor angela merkel's mobile phone for more than ten years. >>> officials in north korea have told nhk they plan to keep a program running that has given people in japan emotional closure. they say they will continue to allow japanese to visit places where their loved ones died. more than 38,000 japanese died in the northern part of the korean peninsula around the end of world war ii. the remains of two-thirds of them are thought to be buried there. nhk world's hiromitsu nagano recently accompanied a group that went to pay respects. >> reporter: three japanese grieved relatives arrived in pyongyang last thursday. one of them was 78-year-old tsuneaki iwata from tokyo. >>
interview that the leaks by edward snowden have done is make the united states rethink how we spy on our allies and how the nsa is controlled. >> should we assume from that answer, sir, that you did or would know if actually that was happening? >> jim, as i said, i'm not here to talk about classified information. what i am confirming is the fact that we're undergoing a complete review of how intelligence -- there are very strict laws governing what we do internally. >> right. >> internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operates. what i have said is that it's important for us to insure as technology develops and expands, that are reflective of our values. >> questions also emerge this past week about how much the president knew about the troubled website that was america's porthole to obama care. the website that came online and then offline. >> this is unacceptable. it needs to be fixed. >> of course the administration keeps pointing out that the fate of obama care does not rest solely on its website. today the president responded to the possibility that
classified documents provided by former nsa contractor edward snowden. spanish government officials summoned the u.s. ambassador for an explanation. spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. >>> german media are reporting that agents also bugged chancellor angela merkel's phone. u.s. officials have not denied the allegation but say no such surveillance is taking place now. they say they're conducting a review of their intelligence gathering methods. >> i noted the other day a readout from a phone call the president had with chancellor merkel made clear that we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> carney said last summer president barack obama ordered a comprehensive review of how the u.s. gathers intelligence. he said the investigation should be completed by the end of the year. defense secretary chuck hagel says the allegations do not reflect a lack of respect. >> we have great respect for our partners, our allies, who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe, to keep each other safe, to keep our
will continue through the middle of next year and be the major issue. >> i predict edward snowden's revelations of widespread u.s. eves dropping on top european leaders will derail president obama's u.s., europe, free trade talks. 35 of them. bye bye. >> rose: welcome to the program, tonight a former chairman of the federal reserve, alan greenspan, his new book is called the map and the territory, risk human nature and the future of forecasting. >> i was already a economist but i was also what is known as a logical massachusettsiveist -- positivist which says if you can't measure it, it doesn't exist. that spritd me from the understanding how humans behavior, the irrational is not worth doing. she demonstrated to me that i was wrong. that didn't have a full effect immediately but it grew on me. and i look back now and i think some of my views involved in recent years to fall back on if i was stillwnhi wouldn't read t. >> rose: we conclude this evening with david kelly and his brother tom kelly. they have written a new book called creative confidence. >> i'm thinking is that methodology that
. among those is lungo. she was outraged. former vice president dick cheney said that he believes snowden is a trader, plain and simple. >> i hope we can catch him at some point in time. he violated the conditions under which he got the information. >> reporter: snowden also has his supporters. >>> the fbi held a ceremony to honor its new director. he said he wished his mother could see him now. >> she snapped over the shades every single mother and said, rise and shine and show the world what you're made of. i found it less inspiring at the time, but it made us who we are. and i will never forget that. >> come was the number two official when the nsa's wiretapping program came up for renewal. then attorney general ashrcroft was hospitalized at the time. he became fbi director last month. >>> a local baseball hero and a special tribute to his hometown petaluma and the 707 area code in sonoma county. >>> in two minutes the next hurdle to keep b.a.r.t. trains moving. we'll ask b.a.r.t. workers if they'll approve the deal. >>> new video from hayward. tonight the building on jackson and graha
was outraged. former vice president dick cheney said that he believes snowden is a trader, plain and simple. >> i hope we can catch him at some point in time. he violated the conditions under which he got the information. >> reporter: snowden also has his supporters. >>> the fbi held a ceremony to honor its new director. he said he wished his mother could see him now. >> she snapped over the shades every single mother and said, rise and shine and show the world what you're made of. i found it less inspiring at the time, but it made us who we are. and i will never forget that. >> come was the number two official when the nsa's wiretapping program came up for renewal. then attorney general ashrcroft was hospitalized at the time. he became fbi director last month. >>> a local baseball hero and a special tribute to his hometown petaluma and the soon, californians from to salinas to san diego will have equal access to quality health insurance. those who need financial assistance will get it. and nobody will be denied because of a pre-existing condition. welcome to a new state of health. welcome
. if a special committee is set it it may end up calling witnesses including chancellor merkel and snowden who revealed the surveillance program and given asylum in russia. >> reporter: pressure has been growing on the u.s. intelligence gathering operations and started in june when edward snowden leaked evidence of the national security agency was collecting phone records of tens of millions of americans and u.s. allies in latin america got angry after revelations nsa ran a surveillance program and this is echoed by european leaders after the monitoring of spain and france and italy and it's not just ordinary people, citizens, phone calls of up to 35 world leaders were also tapped. the german chancellor's phone may have been monitored for up to ten years. and this is the former cia officer is joining me now from healthfield in england and you are back from the united states, what are your friends in the intelligence community saying about this there? >> it has become a political event in the united states. the issue is not so much whether or not the united states was surveilling other countri
is that these reports were based on the misreading of a single slide released by edward snowden. and that slide showing these numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, i in of this meta data, that's with a it was. not phone call or conten was done by european services, not by the nsa. that it was not in fact the citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> the assertions by spain, italy, that nsa collected ten of million of phone call are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect, they're saying that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing. the misinterpretation, erin, of a single power point slid
before snowden, but definitely since snowden, talking about transparency going back a number of years under reauthorization of patrioting and fisa that we testified in the past and so forth, but certainly since, you know, june of this year when we started learning a lot more about what is going on, we've been talking, clearly, about the need for transparency, sent letters to both the president and congress and a number of members that filed a suit in the fisk against the government for the ability under first amendment irrationallization for the ability to talk to their users and their customers about what is being collected and how it's being collected, and the sheer, just the amount, the numbers of collection orders that they receive. we've also been, cci's been vocal in supporting a number of bills here on the hill, i think both senate and house side, that would call for greater trarps paraphernalia sigh on the -- transparency and on the part of government on what they collect and how much information is actually being transferred. we're doing that because we think it's really impo
released by edward snowden and said a few things about it. one, not the nsa listening in on this call data. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this h
harvesting those phone calls. edward snowden has not only gotten in the middle of the united states versus the rest of the world, he's gotten in between the governments and their own spy agencies, which is perhaps one reason why the article is saying, let's not worry too much about this. let's move onto the -- >> nothing to see here. >> let's move onto the economic discussion. we don't want to get too deep in the weeds. >> you would need a greyhound depot for the buses that people are trapped under. dianne feinstein, a muscular proponent of expensive surveillance and has repeatedly carried water for two administrations to expand the surveillance laws is furious apparently by her own statements primarily because she was out of the loop. she like the president reportedly out of the loop. the nsa out of the loop compared to obviously some of their targets. the only loop that seems to work here is at the nsa itself, where you have 25,000 employees working on a bunch of important security stuff and a bunch of other stuff, which if you believe the president, is nonessential. and is not part of o
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
on and talk about edward snowden. does he consider himself a hero as supporters do. how does he react to the anger of those who call him a traitor? >> i think he is disappointed. he doesn't consider himself a hero. i think he eschews any such label. i think he considers himself a patriot and an american and a whistleblower. and i think that's right. obviously all sorts of incendiary and inflammatory words have been thrown around, some of which don't even fit the legal definition, if people were to bother to look it up. but, no, he didn't see himself as a hero. >> one of the people attending the rally, a man named dave miller, told u.s.a. today, the national progress is more control, more power. no matter what they say, we're going down the path towardteri ttierney? do you agree? >> i think we are in the position of turnkey tierney. we are right there. we are following the playbook. >> how has it hurt anybody? >> how has it hurt anybody? the fact that all of our personal information is being stored in a big data storage facility in utah, anybody at any time who works for the nsa or any
governments should be aware that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone callings. that's european parliamentary delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the mass surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, both political and business. >> that was al jazerra reporting. also on monday the head of the senate intelligence committee, diane feinstein once a loyal supporter of the nsa broke ranks she can norankssaying she is opf collecting intelligence on u.s. allies. words of praise from president obama during a ceremony formally installing his new fbi director. he took over for a stepping down director. president obama describes him as someone who knows what is right and what is wrong. he served as a deputy attorney general during the georg
that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation and the dragnetting of that i have citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. >>> president of the philippines is questioning the authenticity of a video that appears to show hostages being shot at by the army during a siege last month. now fighting between the philippine army and the hostage takers left many dead in the southern city there. in just a moment we'll be getting the military's reaction, but first here more details. >> reporter: the maker of that online video says it shows hostages shouting at the army not to shoot. they are waving the white flag of vendor. nearby, carrying weapons are said to be national liberation front rebels. the military is believed to have opened fire. some fall while others scamper for safety. he is no stranger to armed conflict. he fought as a soldier against the mlmf which they first independents at the end of the 9060s, now the very same fighters were the ones that held him hostage. >> we are so happy because we thought a cease
. >> so let me ask you this. was the leaker in question, ed snowden, was he a traitor? >> you're asking me? >> yes. >> absolutely. >> would that be the opinion also of general alexander? is that your opinion? >> absolutely. >> mr. engliss? >> yes, ma'am. >> and mr. cole? >> he's been charged not with treason but certainly leaking and compromising the integrity of our intelligence system. >> in your opinion, mr. cole, would he be considered a traitor to the united states? >> this is a matter that's -- >> just your personal opinion. >> unfortunately as a justice department official where there's a case involved, it's difficult for me to do that under the rules of professional responsibility. >> does the white house consider mr. snowden a traitor? >> i think best to ask -- you say the white house collectively. i think most people feel that he's done a great disservice to the country. >> i yield back. >> could i just make sure -- i want to make sure i answered all the snowden thing. i answered them quick. if i could just ask the deputy attorney general just to make sure i hit those all right.
through the country. >> since the snowden leaks, what many are trying to figure out is is the u.s. doing something beyond the pale any other country is doing? >> the u.s. certainly isn't the only country with a spy agency. the u.s. and the group of allied countries who participate in this information sharing program, sometimes called five eyes after a world war ii agreement, it's certainly the largest and most sophisticated. >> so they're the best at doing it. let's talk about chancellor merkel and how her phone was under surveillance. what type of surveillance would it have been under? i imagine that a leaderrer of germany would have some sort of super in crypted cell phone. >> it's possible that it was super encrypted, but it's a phone sending or radio signals, and what it sounds like from reports in the german newspaper is that the surveillance is being conducted from the upper floors of the american embass in berlin. they had antennas there and recording perhaps not the contents of the calls, we don't know, but certainly the position and use of the phone. >> certainly that was not un
by edward snowden in spain in the last couple of days in france in germany, has been of such a proportion and scale that that was not expected, and the spying on leaders has been of such a length of time and invasiveness that that was not expected. so it's about scale and proportionality as well. yes, people expect spying. yes friend-on-friend spying is not entirely unexpected, we're not naive. but friend on friend spying of this degree, by citizens around the world by the nsa allegedly is something that needs to be investigated. this is not just a human rights issue, this has commercial implications. if plas data has been taken on this scale and encryption has been compromised that is a commercial issue. we are asking number one, that we get to the truth because we can't -- you have to reestablish trust between the eu and u.s. on this. this is important. secondly we're saying get some proportionality into this. we need to begin a process that says look we're not expecting some admission tomorrow but let's start a process of accountability. we have a problem in the european union. we have
sun light into the process, none would have been known if not for edward snowden, who was treated as a trader, but reason is because of the revelations he came out with. neil: and has yet it come out with, matt welch thank you. >> thank you, neil. neil: what do you want for holiday this year? we asked our twitter followers, what do they want from santa. one wants a playstation 4. and an xbox 1. he is 48 years old, i don't know, and another one, a new playstation 4, and galaxy nexus 5 start phone, why the high-tech wish list could give us all headaches. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better
and nsa contractor snowden just keep coming. the newspaper say the ns a secretly monitored 60 million phone calls and just in one month. in washington mixed reaction from lawmakers. >> this whole notion that we go after each other on what is really legitimate protection of nation state interest i think is disingenuous. >> i think we have rae pair work to did and i think we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa what is really happening in the program. >> meeting with lawmakers and administration officials. nsa survillains program is on the agenda and administration insist that's not the main focus. this is abc news washington. >> the doctor convicted in the death of michael jackson is out of jail but not without some fireworks between his lawyer and fans of the late pop star. watch. >> you know if you weren't so iing norpt involuntary manslaughter. >> l heated exchange over shadow murray uneventful release from the jail. measurely slipped out of the back part of the building out of sight of reporters. former cardiologist served nearly two years in the 4 year sentence for ca
? >> well, there is a lot of it. and you sort of see this continuing because of all of these snowden disclosures, chris. the latest narrative you're seeing from republicans is painting president obama as a bystander in his own administration. this is something the rnc is trying to get traction with. they're pointing not only to the nsa program but to obama care as well. we heard from health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius, she told sanjay gupta that the president wasn't aware of the issues with that website until after it launched. that's what republicans are saying. but the white house predictably pushing back on this saying it's not really apples to apples here. we heard from white house press secretary jay carney. he said, kate, this is conflating disparate issues. >> brianna, thank you so much for that update. let's stay at the white house. the white house is responding to deadline pressure clarifying that americans will have until march 31st to sign up for obama care. this as the president's advisers are fighting back against another claim and denying that million
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)